An analysis of the essential understandings in elementary geometry and a comparison to the common core standards with teaching implications

Helen Crompton 1, Sarah Ferguson 2 *
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1 Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA
2 University of Cincinnati, Batavia, OH, USA
* Corresponding Author
EUR J SCI MATH ED, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp. 258-275. https://doi.org/10.30935/scimath/14361
Published Online: 14 March 2024, Published: 01 April 2024
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ABSTRACT

Geometry and spatial reasoning form the foundations of learning in mathematics. However, geometry is a subject often ignored by curriculum writers and teachers until high school, leading to students lacking in critical skills in geometric reasoning. As the United States moves into a new curriculum epoch, heralding the commencement of the national common core standards (CCS), one could question if CCS in geometry align with the essential understandings children need to be successful geometric thinkers. This paper begins with an examination of the essential understandings of geometric reasoning leading to an interpretation and critique of the elementary geometry CCS. Finally, the instructional implications are discussed, considering the common core progression through what we know about how children learn geometry.

CITATION

Crompton, H., & Ferguson, S. (2024). An analysis of the essential understandings in elementary geometry and a comparison to the common core standards with teaching implications. European Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 12(2), 258-275. https://doi.org/10.30935/scimath/14361

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